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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 452 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the region's fij troubles. but the auto market in russia is in high gear. new vehicle sales last year topped 2.9 million units, closing the gap with the largest european market, germany. people from vladivostok, who work in the industry, have long lived in the shadow of those from moscow. but now they're taking a turn in the spotlight. nhk world's anastasia strebkova reports. >> reporter: in vladivostok about 90% of the vehicles on the road are foreign brand name cars including japanese. several vehicles used to dominate the market, fwhu cars have been outnumbering used autos in recent years. a japanese affiliate handles car sales of toyota motor in vladivostok. it is projected a jump in sales, so the dealership renovated its showroom. it achieved its sales target last year, 2,000 units for the first time. >> translator: everything about japanese cars is good. they are comfortable and economical. if you want to buy a car, i recommend a japanese one. >> reporter: sports utility vehicles are big sellers. they're useful on the icy roads that are common in russia's far east. vehicles are aut $10
no stocks. >> buying russia. >> you're buying russia? >> russia is terribly depressed. nobody likes russia. i'm buying the bonds, the currency and stocks >> you think you'll be able to get your money out of russia when you want to? >> maria -- >> what's the answer? >> hold on. i've been bearish on russia for 46 years. i first went there in 1966. i've changed my mind and, yes, i think -- i'm not giving my money to putin, i hope. >> really. >> i for the first time in 46 years have decided to invest in russia. >> so you believe there's the rule of law there. you believe that this is -- you're buying russia over the united states of america? >> everybody is pessimistic. listen to your question. everybody is pessimistic on russia. russia is changing. that's how you make money. you find something that everybody hates, including me, including you. when it's changing and that's how you make money. >> everybody hates apple right now. would you buy it? >> no, no, i'm short apple. >> how come? >> because short in the fall because it went through the fall. >> september. fantastic. >> anyway, i wouldn'
to an issue of intense friction between the united states and russia. the adoption of russian children by americans. authorities in texas are investigating what's described as the suspicion death of a 3-year-old boy adopted from russia. russia's foreign ministry blames the death last month on inhuman abuse. david mattingly is following the developments for us. lay out the details. >> what we know about the boy and the parents is not much today, but we do know that the boy and his brother were both adopted and living in the same house in texas. officials there say that the buy was found unresponsive and that his mother called 911. that happened on january 21st. that was just days after his third birthday. >> what are texas and u.s. government officials saying about this case? >> well, texas officials are looking into this because they are compelled to investigate any death of a young child that is not natural or is unknown. so there was an automatic investigation that was triggers here. they call is suspicion. they could hurry this up, but under normal circumstances we may not have the
mentalvo. >>> international suspicion over a little boy adopted in russia. >>> plus, potential problem for alec baldwin. a photographer making accusations and the actor now firing back. work? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair has the fastest retinol formula. to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. neutrogena®. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. if you're still having difficulty breathing, ask your doctor if including advair could help improve your lung function. ge
and that in a moment, but first, to the events of russia. the media or was first spotted at around 9:20 a.m. local time. russia's academy of science said it into the atmosphere at a speed of over 50,000 kilometers per hour and then shattered into pieces. >> the media is thought to have been just about two meters across, but that was enough to cause a massive sonic boom, and it was far from harmless. hundreds of people were injured, most of them by shattering glass. >> a rare moment caught on camera -- don turned to daylight as the media or into the earth's atmosphere with a bang -- dawn turned to daylight. it streaked above the sky leaving a white trail. mobile phones stopped working. the shock wave set off car alarms, and local residents were left wondering what was happening. >> i saw something moving in the sky. then there was a flash. we thought it was fireworks. that was followed by an explosion. the weather broke. t, bread, and water -- everything felony floor. -- the window for. >> windows were blown out of dozens of buildings. most of the injuries were light. hundreds have been treated at local
abandoned. isn't that feeling of abandonment justified when we think the vague powers and russia to help libya? -- the big powers and russia to help libya? >> i am not sure how justified it is -- the big powers rushed help libya? >> i am not sure how justified it is, but it is understandable people feel alone. people feel oppressed by a regime that will quite literally stop at nothing. >> the u.s. defense secretary wanted to arm the syrian rebels, but the white house did not want to. do you think there is a chance the white house might change its mind? >> i think it is inevitable with the change of team, particularly yith secretary of state carrkerr coming in, but there has to be a complete revamping of strategy. that may be a decision they come with. >> you think it would tips the balance at this point? >> what i would support as the united states making a move to form a relationship with carefully vetted rebel groups. i think the united states has come to the conclusion armed people on the ground are going to be dictating a series of's future -- dictating syria's future. it could inclu
such as the united states, china and russia. about 70,000 people gathered to attend park's inauguration. many of them want her to address the growing income gap between rich and poor and they want her to stabilize relations on the korean peninsula. >> translator: i won a place at the inauguration online. i just graduated from university but haven't found a job yet. i hope our new president will focus on job creation. >> translator: i'm concerned about north korea. they seem to be doing things to provoke other countries, so i hope park's government can resolve these issues. >> reporter: park has now moved into the blue house where she spent part of her 20s when her father was president. after she hosted a party with south korean politicians and foreign dignitaries, the festivities will be over and she will have to start putting her promises into practice. anna jung, nhk world, seoul. >>> park inherits a host of challenges and some are wondering whether she will fare any better than her predecessor, lee myung-bak. lee hongchun, professor at keio university, drew insights from park's inaugural speech. w
. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. canadian ice hockey star michael garnett plays for the chelyabinsk team and lives in the city. i was awakened by this loud bang, crash and shaking in my apartment that, you know,
russia today with the power of an atomic bomb, shattering windows and injuring more than 1,000 people. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonightwe get the latest on the spectacle, and today's other cosmic event-- a close encounter with a large asteroid. >> this thing is pretty big. it's about half the size of a football field, although there are larger ones out there that we're tracking. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner updates the president's push to curb gun violence as he takes his case to his hometown of chicago. >> brown: mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks with homeland security secrery janet nolitano about combating the gring threat of cyber attacks. >> to the extent that some are seeking to infiltrate our network, steal that information, not have to invest in the research and development that goes into innovation, that's a really big deal. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> ppo
, the olympian. >>> still ahead, the danger from outer space. reaction from russia's close enkousht with a ten-ton meteorite. you're watching "andrea mitchell reportings" only on msnbc. i wanted to call on a few people. ashley, ashley marshall... here. since we're often all on the move, ashley suggested we use fedex office to hold packages for us. great job. [ applause ] thank you. and on a protocol note, i'd like to talk to tim hill about his tendency to use all caps in emails. [ shouting ] oh i'm sorry guys. ah sometimes the caps lock gets stuck on my keyboard. hey do you wanna get a drink later? [ male announcer ] hold packages at any fedex office location. >>> in south africa olympian oscar pistorius sobbed openly in a south african court today as he formally was charged in had the murder of his girlfriend. a sports icon in hits country, pistorius made history as the first double amputee track athlete to compete in the olympic games. joining me now is mary core i willo with nbc sports who knows him well, profiled oscar pistorius at his home last summer for "rock center" and has been follow
with russia. a more powerful and emboldened china. an iran closer to a nuclear weapon, slark terrorists fans out across north america? simply put, under barack obama and hillary clinton, the u.s. has been unwilling to lead. and this has left a huge vacuum on the world stage. in a recent assessment of secretary clinton's tenure. michael owe o'hanlon of the brookings institute wrote even an admirers such as myself must admit few big problems were soflted on her watch. few big vic trises achieved. secretary clinton's work at the state department should be judged on whether she has left america's foreign policy in stronger or weaker position. most think the future lies with china than the u.s. it's not all mrs. clinton's fault. but the fact is we just don't have the influence we used to have around the world from syria to mali, we have led from behind, so in effect the former secretary of state has helped manage our decline in what looks increasingly like a post american world. and that's the memo. now on to the top story. another view on this, joining us now from new york, fox news contributor
. it is caught on tape. [explosion] this happened 900 miles east of moscow in russia. happened in broad daylight too. good morning, everybody. there is lot to talk about this today. i'm bill hemmer. plenty of stuff. welcome on a friday morning. welcome to heather. >> i'm heather nauert in for martha maccallum heather: it create a shock wave. it bloke glass for hundreds of miles. lots of people were hospitalized. bill: it is so pure because it is day time. there are so many shots of this too. you can see the traffic moving through the street. they say sometimes when this happens, it will happen over the ocean or over the sea. and you don't get the same images. heather: you never know about it. bill: but this is a big city now. happened in a big russian city in the ural mountains, hours before a asteroid buzzes either to the closest on record but we're told there is no connection. greg palkot has more in london. what do we know about this event, greg. >> reporter: amazing amateur video we've been watching as you folks at that i can take it in as well. it happened in a russian city 130 miles east o
-old boy. the question, what does it mean for other families trying to adopt from russia? implications of this little boy's death, straight ahead. we're back in a moment. with the spark cash card from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, please? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase every day. great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. read back the chicken's testimony, please. "buk, buk, bukka!" [ male announcer ] get the spark business card from capital one and earn unlimited rewards. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase every day. told you i'd get half. what's in your wallet? just one bite ope told you i'd get half. ♪ a flavor paradise wof delicious fishes ♪ ♪ friskies seafood sensations. ♪ feed the senses. >>> welcome back, everybody. our team, ron brownstein is back the "national journal." abby huntsman of huff post live and chuck blow. i love that you tweet you're coming on. you lea
of the munich conference, including wooing russia to join the coalition of countries opposed to the syrian regime. >> our political correspondent is also in munich to follow the conference for us there. the conflict in syria is likely to be high on the agenda. can we expect any developments? >> that's right. it is on the official agenda both in a night owl session late tonight and also on sunday morning. it is very much on the unofficial agenda as well. one of the functions of the munich security conference is to serve as a venue for bilateral or multilateral meetings behind closed doors, given the fact that there are so many key players here, and on the syrian issue, they include both the head of the syrian opposition and also the united nations international envoy for syria. we also have the u.s. viper -- vice-president attending the conference and the russian foreign minister, it is more likely that in some consolation or other, they will come together. there were announcements of willingness to hold negotiations with the assad regime. the u.s. had set up until now they were not willing
from another province. he says the cans are selling well. >>> senior officials from japan and russia are trying to resolve the things that divide them. they found common ground in an area of mutual concern. they met in moscow for the japan-russia strategic dialogue. the scope of the discussion went well beyond their two countries. japan's vice foreign minister met with the deputy foreign minister. the diplomats agreed to work together to encourage the north koreans to exercise self-restraint. japanese prime minister shinzo abe plans to visit russia some time this year. saying russian officials, too, want to nurture the relationship. haveundamental diffences d they over russian-held islands which are claimed by japan. but they've agreed to work toward resolving territorial and other disputes. their own to clarify the official on the northern claims. they want to be understood in and outside the country. japan is caught up over the senkaku islands. right now teams fm the foreign min tri, the cabinet office and the cabinet handle those files. they will expand the cabinet team to coordin
of the countries i have visited. that includes the chief justice of the supreme court of russia, where we had a long conversation one-on-one talking about issues like this. i tell you what happens in other countries and what they are doing. in russia, for example, you have 200,000 jurors. you don't even have to go to high school. you have no attorney-client privilege. you go to court. they only have 35,000 average cats. -- advocates. they handle the most difficult cases. we were talking about how to professionalize, if you will, the legal profession. the aba was formed 133 years ago only for two purposes. one, to create a code of ethics for all lawyers. the second one is to increase the quality of legal education. that is still our fundamental mission. so, one suggestion i made at that time to the chief justice is you have got to give lawyers a monopoly. the only way -- this sounds self-serving, and it is not -- the only way to professionalize it is to have a group of people that have a monopoly so that you can control that group of people, so that they are subject to an ethical code, and so
and increasing pressure in the internet age. racing to be ready in time. russia is spending a day. -- spending big. today there was another development in the ongoing standoff between china and japan in the east china seas. a day after accusing the warship of using weapons on a japanese destroyer, japan's prime minister fired back, describing it as a provocative act. he said the country's need to go back to a strategic partnership with mutual benefit. after the recent flare-up, is that possible? >> on january 30, japan says the chinese navy locked its radar on a japanese destroyer in the east china sea. about 10 days earlier, tokyo says another chinese for gates -- chinese frigate did the same to a helicopter. japan cost prime minister condemned the incident. >> at a time they are resuming talks, it is regrettable china has carried out provocative action towards japan. >> the incidents are reported to have taken place close to this group of islands in the east china sea, which japan controls but china claims as its own. for months japanese and chinese coast guard ships have been engaged in a g
of russia in this context. when it comes to this issue, there are really quite a few differences between the two sides, but they are not really relevant. it is the united states and russia that have to reach an understanding when it comes to dealing with the syrian crisis. iran is important when it comes to the army of the opposition, but politically speaking, russia is the main supporter of the opposition. >> thanks very much. >> in germany, chancellor angela merkel is looking at the possibility of perhaps having to reshuffle her cabinet. after a university committee withdrew the doctoral title from, of all people, the country's education minister after finding she had plagiarized her thesis. >> commentators are comparing this to the transportation minister being caught drunk driving or the finance minister hiding cash in monaco. for now, though, the chancellor is giving her support. >> the german cabinet is full of doctors. the finance minister, the foreign affairs minister, the economy minister and vice chancellor, and, of course, the chancellor herself, dr. angela merkel. it is an un
from russia following an incident in the air. defense ministry officials say two russian war planes violated the country's air space on thursday. they say it happened just before 3:00 p.m. southwest of rishiri island off hokkaido. air self defense force commander scrambled four fighter jets. the russian aircraft left japanese air space after about a minute. officials immediately launched a protest with the russian embassy in tokyo. they are calling for an investigation. russian authorities say they will confirm the details. foreign ministry spokespersons say this is the first time in five years russian aircraft have violated japanese air space. february 7th is significant because that's the date in 1855 japanese and russian leaders signed a treaty recognizing the islands as part of japan. people in tokyo held an annual rally on thursday to call on russia to honor that agreement and return the territory. prime minnesout minister abe vop working. he told vladimir putin that he wants to find a solution. a swift solution is needed. >> translator: the japanese government will press ahead
." still to come -- backstage drama at russia's famous bolshoi ballet after an attack on its artistic director. now one of its biggest stars claims there is a conspiracy against him. we may finally have an answer to one of the most hotly contested questions in science -- where did we all evolves from -- evolve from? an international effort has been mapping out thousands of trades to tradestrait -- traits to unlock the clues. >> it is interesting to see that this hypothetical central ancestors had a number of features very different from ours. very -- for example, for all over its body. a white, for a belly, long, furry tail -- white, furry belly and long, furry tail. fleshy nose not unlike ours. it had year bonds to help it here and translate sounds from noise into neurological impulses -- it had ear bones. it had some features that were like us and some that were different. we might be able to pick this up in both of our hands, but it is different in that it is much less specialized. >> how did humans evolve from that creature? >> this is an interesting question. one thing our study
administration to have the dispute solved in a peaceful manner. prime minister abe is planning to visit russia before the end of the year to meet with the president. when he does another dispute, another issue will be on the agenda. russia control tgs islands and japan claims them. >> translator: this is an important year to build a new relationship. i hope it paves the way for abe's visit. >> mori delivered a letter from abe. putin said he, too, hoped for better things ahead. >> translator: i'm looking forward to meeting with prime minister abe. i hope it will lead to improved relations. >> mori and putin discussed a statement issued in 2001 when mori was prime minister. the statement reaffirmed the validity of the 1956 japan soviet joint declaration. the declaration states that russia will return two of the disputed islands to japan after a peace treaty is signed. officials never signed the treaty. still, mori and putin agreed they can't ignore the statement. putin says it's abnormal that the countries have no peace treaty. mori says japanese and russian leaders need to resolve the territori
with russia. four islands off northern japan are held by the russians and claimed by the japanese. mori says he wants leaders to find a mutually acceptable situation. mori is abe's special enjoy to russia. he held talks with president putin, then spoke at a university in moscow. >> translator: if all four islands were returned, japan would be the winner. if both sides agreed to maintain the status quo, russia would be the winner. but such solutions would lead to lingering resentment on both sides. >> mori said exploring an acceptable solution will be the core of political negotiations and he said he wants prime minister abe to visit moscow as soon as possible for the first official summit in ten years. >>> a sporting hero on trial for allegedly murdering his girlfriend is free again. at least for the time being. a magistrate in south africa granted bail to paralympic gold medalist, oscar court officials accepted his claim that he shot his girlfriend by mistake and said they didn't think he'd flee. he was arrested last week at his home. they found his girlfriend dead there with gun shot wound
with the president. he sent president mori to russia last week to begin longstanding talks with russia. abe will meet later this year with vladimir putin to discuss the territories which are controlled by russia and claimed by japan. abe and obama agreed to cooperate on another source of concern. they said they'll work through the u.n. secretary council on tougher sanctions in north korea. they have urged leaders in pyongyang to stop the provocation, however, those leaders have already signalled their intentions to defy those warnings. president obama indulged the japan-u.s. alliance the central foundation for allegiance security. abe agreed it worked to their mutual benefit. >>> china's leaders were paying close attention to abe's visit, and they didn't like what they heard. a government spokesperson took issue with another statement on ownership of the senkaku islands. >> translator: no matter what excuses are made, japan can't change the fact that it illegally occupies chinese territory. >> they will urge china's leaders to address the issue correctly. she said they should be able to work to impro
killed. but i think that this is a more important than that he still gets the backing from russia and iran to believe he will still be able to survive and be able to crush the revolution. the key issue right now is that is still protected by the international community. the international community just had a statement rather than taking action. we see the not put red lines for assad, or how many victims killed or what type of weapons he has been using. he started using not only the air force every day against the civilians, but the missiles. >> it seems we do not get a change in stance from russia and china on this. where is the dialogue going to come from? >> it is clear that there is no change from russia and china. i do not think we need to risk more lives. talking to the russians, they will not change their stance. they are still backing and supplying the assad regime with ammunition. yesterday, in my talks to some of the activists, the rebels, the fighters on the ground, they informed me that there is a new type of tool coming and being used by the army. they have never seen
, will engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenals and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into wrong lands. >> so how many nuclear weapons does the president want to reduce? of the 1700 nuclear weapons the u.s. now possesses, the white house believes 1000 to 1100 warheads would provide an equal level of security. >> under one scenario is 1000 war leads to lower thresholds to maintain a capable nuclear deterrent. >>> if we have to blow-up more than one p planet we might need more than 1000 nuclear warheads. >> is this a reciprocal deal with russia. >> we may as well try to get something for it. >> these are strategic warheads you are talking about i don't know. >> yes. >> 1000 of these, are about 50 times the size of north korea. 1000 is fine if the russians come down and the chinese stay down to thissal level because nobody can do a first strike. >> are the russians wanting to go along? >> i think they are. these things are very expense to maintain. russia has real problems. >> where did we see that not long ago? we saw it when f
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 452 (some duplicates have been removed)